Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar

Making Vinegar is one of those really easy things to do.

You can use almost any fruit.  I use apples, or rather apple peels, and cores.  So, making vinegar always begins with an apple dish, and I save the peels and cores for the vinegar.

Here’s one apple dish I make – homemade apple cinnamon oatmeal:

I use regular oatmeal and chopped apple, sprinkle with cinnamon sugar & nutmeg, add water and microwave for a few minutes.  No silly little expensive packages with a few dried bits of apple.

This is the real thing.  It’s filling and yummy, too.
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Save those peels and cores and place them in a jar and cover with water.  Add a little raw apple cider vinegar as a starter culture, cover with a cloth and band and set in a dark place to ferment.

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Continue adding cores and peels as you accumulate them.
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Your vinegar is done when it is the strength you like.
Strain and compost the solids.

© Nancy Babbitt and Just Desserts Blog, 2013-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Nancy Babbitt and Just Desserts Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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I Relish the Fact That You’ve Mustard the Strength to Ketchup With Me

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Making my own condiments – catsup, mustard, relish.
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Homemade Catsup
In a saucepan, whisk together and bring to a boil:
12oz Tomato Paste
1 1/2 Cups Water
1/4 Cup Brown Sugar
2 teaspoons Salt
1/4 teaspoon each Onion Powder, Ground Cumin, Cinnamon, Dry Mustard, Granulated Garlic, Ground Cloves
Simmer for a few minutes then allow to cool.
Add:
1/4 Raw Apple Cider Vinegar

Adding Raw Apple Cider Vinegar once all is cool, makes this a living probiotic food.
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Homemade Mustard
In a non-reactive container soak overnight:
1 Cups Raw Apple Cider Vinegar
1/2 cup Filtered Water
2/3 Cup Yellow Mustard Seed
1/3 Cup Brown Mustard Seed
The next day place above mixture in blend and mix with:
2 Tablespoons Honey or Brown Sugar
1, 2, or 3 teaspoons Salt (adjust to your taste)
Mix all until consistency you desire.  If a thinner mustard is desired, add more water.
Place in a nonreactive container and age for a few days at room temperature – until it’s bitterness goes away.
If a hot mustard is desired, refrigerate it once the bitterness is gone.
If you prefer a more mild mustard, age it longer so that the heat will dissipate, then refrigerate.
Experiment with your mustard seed, you can use yellow, brown, or black mustard seed & in any combination.  You can choose any vinegar or sweetener of your choice too.

This too, is a probiotic food if you choose to use a raw vinegar.
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My homemade Bread-and-Butter Pickles become . . .
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The best Sweet Pickle Relish I’ve ever tasted . . .
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With just a quick zap of the blender stick!
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© Nancy Babbitt and Just Desserts Blog, 2013-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Nancy Babbitt and Just Desserts Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.